Fixed Probate Fees, call:

0800 612 6105


Alternatively local rate:

020 8150 2010

Contesting a Will

It stands to reason that in most cases, the last thing your loved one wants to do is create a problem for those left behind after they have gone.  Despite this, thousands of people continue to ignore the need to prepare a Will which can be followed in the eventuality of their death.  This means that when the worst does happen, their Estate is left ‘Intestate’ and unfortunately, the family and friends involved have absolutely no say in who is awarded what.  Even if there were verbal promises to leave everything or individual items to specific people, there is no document to back this up and this will not necessarily then be the case.

Probate guidelines state that the first person to be considered when there is no Will is the partner, who will be initially regarded as the estate beneficiary but only if the partnership was officially recognised either by marriage or a civil partnership ceremony.  If such a ceremony never took place, then unfortunately, the partner is not automatically entitled to anything.

However, under these circumstances, the surviving partner can make a claim under the Inheritance (Provision for Family and Dependents) Act 1975.  The claim must be lodged within six months of the person’s death, and the wording states that in order to be awarded certain assets from the Estate, the claimant must ‘be able to show that they were maintained wholly or partly by the deceased’.

To avoid unnecessary additional stress and grief, we will continue to campaign for English adults to set aside only a few hours to prepare a Will and ensure that their loved ones are remembered and in some instances, cared for, after their death.

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Call us today on:

0800 612 6105

Or on local rate:

020 8150 2010

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admin@iwc-ltd.co.uk